Wakame Whole Seaweed Cream Background

Wakame

(Alaria marginata)

$6.80$62.00

Clear
Quantity:

Very mild flavor

Makes a tasty seaweed salad

Cook with rice or vegetable dishes

Description

Wakame has a very mild flavor. It is one of our favorite sea vegetables for cooking with rice or vegetable dishes. It’s also very good when simmered until tender (about 30 minutes) and used in pasta dishes, salads, and marinades. Save and use the broth too!

Wakame is a Brown seaweed and is a great source of calcium, potassium, selenium, and therapeutic polysaccharides. It will retain its quality for two to three years if kept dry and away from light and heat.

Although we strive to produce perfectly clean sea vegetables, please inspect for small crustaceans or shellfish before using.

Potatoes a la Wakame

We adapted this recipe from Evelyn McCoonaughey’s “(H)Alarious Potatoes”, found in her book “Sea Vegetables – Harvesting Guide and Cookbook”
This simple and tasty dish is relatively quick to make and is a wonderful side dish to meat, fish or vegetable dishes. It is also great just with salad.

Makes 2 servings.

Ingredients

• ½ oz dried Wakame
• 1½ cup water
• 5 medium potatoes (about 2 lbs), peeled and cut into ½- ¾ inch size pieces
• 1-2 tsp dried dill weed or basil
• ¾ tsp salt
• Butter or olive oil, freshly ground black pepper and extra salt to taste

Directions

Soak Wakame for 5-10 minutes in a medium size pot with 1½ cups water. Cut out and discard the thick midrib of the Wakame with a sharp knife or scissors. Lay several Wakame “leaves” on top of each other and slice them all at once into thin strips with a sharp knife.

Place back into the pot with the soaking water and add potatoes, dill weed or basil, and salt.
Cover the pot and simmer until potatoes are barely tender (about 30 minutes).
Serve with olive oil or butter, salt and fresh ground pepper to taste.

Harvesting Wakame Seaweed - Naturespirit Herbs
Inspecting Wakame during harvest.
Wakame Hanging - Smiling Gals
Hanging Wakame post harvest.
As a professional chef, I’ve always thought that Chinese Wakame was very unpleasant, and I hoped (correctly, it turns out) that seaweeds from the West coast would yield a far superior product.

Your seaweeds have helped me convince a lot of suspicious people (fellow chefs included) that sea vegetables are delicious! I also like purchasing from small purveyors who are passionate about what they do.”
Frank Cameron
Oregon

Wakame

(Alaria marginata)

$6.80$62.00

Clear
Quantity:

Cook with Rice, Beans and Veggies

Mild Flavor

Makes Tasty Seaweed Salad

Harvesting Wakame Seaweed - Naturespirit Herbs
Inspecting Wakame during harvest.
Wakame Hanging - Smiling Gals
Hanging Wakame post harvest.

Description

Wakame has a very mild flavor. It is one of our favorite sea vegetables for cooking with rice or vegetable dishes. It’s also very good when simmered until tender (about 30 minutes) and used in pasta dishes, salads, and marinades. Save and use the broth too!

Wakame is a Brown seaweed and is a great source of calcium, potassium, selenium, and therapeutic polysaccharides. It will retain its quality for two to three years if kept dry and away from light and heat.

Although we strive to produce perfectly clean sea vegetables, please inspect for small crustaceans or shellfish before using.

Potatoes a la Wakame:

We adopted this recipe from Evelyn McCoonaughey’s “(H)Alarious Potatoes”, found in her book “Sea Vegetables – Harvesting Guide and Cookbook”
This simple and tasty dish is relatively quick to make and is a wonderful side dish to meat, fish or vegetable dishes. It is also great just with salad.
Makes 2 servings.

Ingredients:

• ½ oz dried Wakame
• 1½ cup water
• 5 medium potatoes (about 2 lbs), peeled and cut into ½- ¾ inch size pieces
• 1-2 tsp dried dill weed or basil
• ¾ tsp salt
• Butter or olive oil, freshly ground black pepper and extra salt to taste

Directions:

Soak Wakame for 5-10 minutes in a medium size pot with 1½ cups water. Cut out and discard the thick midrib of the Wakame with a sharp knife or scissors. Lay several Wakame “leaves” on top of each other and slice them all at once into thin strips with a sharp knife.

Place back into the pot with the soaking water and add potatoes, dill weed or basil, and salt.
Cover the pot and simmer until potatoes are barely tender (about 30 minutes).
Serve with olive oil or butter, salt and fresh ground pepper to taste.

As a professional chef, I’ve always thought that Chinese Wakame was very unpleasant, and I hoped (correctly, it turns out) that seaweeds from the West coast would yield a far superior product.

Your seaweeds have helped me convince a lot of suspicious people (fellow chefs included) that sea vegetables are delicious! I also like purchasing from small purveyors who are passionate about what they do.”
Frank Cameron
Oregon